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  • Black community split over black chief

    By Vidya Kauri, NOW Magazine

    The anger against the Toronto Police Service was palpable at a forum hosted last Wednesday night by the Network for the Elimination of Police Violence (NEPV) and Jane Finch Action Against Poverty (JFAAP), of which Gopaul is a resident organizer. Nearly 60 people from the Jane-Finch corridor attended the panel discussion on the significance of having a black police chief. The overwhelming consensus in the room was that a black police chief is tokenism at best.

    Although many came with an anti-police perspective in general, they also rejected Sloly and Saunders as cops who have risen through the ranks by conforming to the organization they are a part of. They likened the heavy police presence in Toronto’s poorer communities to an occupation where cops randomly stop and search civilians. They criticized the Toronto Anti-Violence Intervention Strategy (TAVIS), a policing initiative that aims to reduce crime by working closely with affected communities, as a “destructive” force that subversively collects intelligence on residents whenever officers attend community barbeques and play basketball with youth.

    Sloly has publicly defended carding, which to residents here is essentially about stopping people on the streets, asking for their identification and questioning them even if there are no solid grounds to suspect them of having committed crimes. Although Sloly said in a CBC interview two years ago that carding can make youth feel disenfranchised and unfairly targeted, he also said the practice is a useful tool for sussing out the criminal element.

    Saunders was also blasted by forum organizers as the co-author of a Police and Community Engagement Review on carding that referred to community concerns about racial profiling as “isolated incidents.”

    “These men have been part of, and often times in charge of, the present framework that targets young men and women of colour and harasses them,” said Ellie Adekur-Carlson, the chair of NEPV. “Are they looking to dramatically reform or remove carding practices? Are they looking to shut down TAVIS or the poor oversight? No, they’re not,” she charged.

    Read more: https://nowtoronto.com/news/black-community-split-over-black-chief/

  • Black lives matter

    Editorial, July 22, 2015

    The shooting death of Andrew Loku, 45, at his place of residence by Toronto police on July 5 has become a call to action among groups that advocate for Toronto's Black community.

    https://nationalpostcom.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/family.jpg?w=940&h=672

    It has become a matter of rote that police killings, ostensibly in the line of duty, are explained away after a process of investigation by the Special Investigation Unit (SIU). Regardless of stated efforts by the SIU to find the truth in these fatalities, the reports coming out of their investigations rubber stamp police accounts. The lack of cooperation by police involved in these encounters that lead to either death or injury of a civilian places the SIU at the same level as the current Toronto Police Service Board. The appearance is that whatever the police say goes. It is then left to aggrieved individuals to carry their case forward in the courts. For most people this is a daunting task.

    We do not want to lose faith in the men and women who are tasked with maintaining law and order in this city. However, we are daily faced with the grim reality that regarding the Black community, individual freedom is not a given.

    See more at: http://sharenews.com/black-lives-matter/

     

  • Canada: Police carding regulations amount to putting lipstick on a pig

    By the Network for the Elimination of Police Violence

    The Network for the Elimination of Police Violence (NEPV) rejects the call from the Government of Ontario to retain carding by regulating the practice. Carding is a street harassment practice by cops across Canada that involves the stopping and questioning of civilians in non-criminal interactions and documenting their personal information.

    http://dontai.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/torontopolice4-600x370.jpg

    Carding must be abolished now! We call on all organizations and individuals who are truly interested in community safety to boycott Premier Kathleen Wynne’s public manipulation (consultation) process, and maintain no false illusions about the Ontario government's willingness to engage in genuine dialogue with the communities most affected by police violence.

    This manipulative exercise is an attempt to win moral legitimacy for the repressive, human rights denying practice of carding by providing a false veneer of racial sensitivity, public accountability and community direction to what is in fact a clear expansion and consolidation of the carding regime.

    This strategy can be plainly identified in the recent statements by Ontario's Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services, Yasir Naqvi, in which he simultaneously promotes the government's supposed “zero tolerance” approach to racial profiling and enduring commitment to human rights, while continuing to describe carding as “a necessary and valuable tool” in the arsenal of the police.

    Naqvi would have us believe that police officers in Ontario already hold a sincere commitment to human rights and a zero tolerance approach to racial profiling, as enshrined in the Ontario Police Services Act, despite the obvious evidence to the contrary.

    There is no justifiable reason for carding abolitionists or reformists to celebrate Minister Naqvi’s recent restatement of his June 16 assertion that the regulation of carding will respect the Charter of Rights and Freedom as a victory of sorts. The government is still committed to imposing this form of police violence (carding) on the people of Ontario before the end of 2015.

    Read more at: http://www.pambazuka.net/en/category.php/features/95479

  • Canadian Bacon: Opposing Police and State Power

    By One Toronto Member, One Hamilton Member, One Former Member

    https://thenonconformer.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/0police-state.jpg

    Building a Culture of Working-class Resistance

    Some of the most iconic and inspiring images of popular resistance come from riots and insurrectional moments which, to outside observers, appear on televisions and computer screens as spontaneous reactions to a singularly egregious incident of police brutality. Yet for every anti-police riot that grabs the media's attention, there are countless daily acts of oppression and defiance that may not make the news, but which all play a contributing role in kicking things off. Rather than morbidly waiting around for the police to kill someone before springing into action, anarchists and anti-authoritarian revolutionaries who want to see more anti-police uprisings should seize every opportunity to exploit the daily social tensions that produce them. This means actively participating in building a culture of opposition and hostility to police that permeates all aspects of working-class life.

    Organizing against the police can, and should be incorporated into community struggles around housing, and against the violent gentrification of our neighbourhoods. Police Community Liaison Committees should be systematically infiltrated, and business and property owners who zealously collaborate with police to push out poor and racialized neighbourhood residents should be made to understand that this practice is unacceptable. Community meetings of parents and teachers should be organized, and campaigns should be launched demanding that police be removed from public schools. Building committees and neighbourhood watch programs should be organized, and militants should make the case that neighbours not collaborate with police and immigration enforcement officials. Raising this demand should open space for building a more expansive definition of collaboration that includes any activity that increases social divisions, and allows the police to justify its presence in the community.

    Our principled opposition to police should spill into our workplaces, as well. Anarchists should be talking to our co-workers about police on smoke breaks, and in the lunch room. Retail workers should organize with their co-workers to demand that their store enact a "no-chase" policy, or barring that, for an informal agreement among staff that nobody calls security on shoplifters, because nobody should have to bear the responsibility of someone getting arrested and potentially going to jail, just for stealing from the boss.

    Finally, anarchists should also actively participate in organizations that focus exclusively on combating police violence in ways that go beyond organizing one-off rallies and demonstrations. In Toronto, a number of anarchists, including several members of Common Cause, are active within the Network for the Elimination of Police Violence (NEPV), an organization that conducts community outreach and education on a variety of topics related to policing, and which provides material support and assistance to grassroots anti-policing initiatives based in the city's most marginalized neighbourhoods. While its methodology for community organizing, and internal political education program is still a work in progress, NEPV has witnessed significant growth and development over the past year, and its model is one with potential to spread to other cities across southern Ontario, and beyond.

    Read more: http://www.linchpin.ca/?q=content/canadian-bacon-opposing-police-and-state-power

  • Carding across Canada: Data show practice of 'street checks' lacks mandated set of procedures

    Kristy Hoffman, Patrick White and Danielle Webb,The Globe and Mail

    Between 2009 and 2011, Toronto Police entered 1,104,561 names into its carding database, according to the force's own figures, a staggering effort disproportionately targeting minority groups. Toronto Police say they need carding to gather intelligence and prevent crime, but in doing so they resorted to tactics that sullied their public standing.

    http://basicsnews.ca/wp-content/uploads/tory-saunders-kevin-van-paassen-globe-and-mail.jpg

    In recent months, the force's carding efforts have been reined in, thanks largely to intense community pressure. Under a new policy, Toronto officers must inform residents they have the right to walk away from a carding engagement at any time and conclude any such interaction by issuing a receipt.

    While the carding controversy is confined to Toronto, documenting interactions with community members, also known as a "street check," is common practice for major police forces across Canada. Rules guiding that process, however, are vague or non-existent in most cases.

    A Globe and Mail analysis found the practice lacks a mandated set of procedures after 21 Canadian police forces answered questions about interacting with community members in their respective jurisdictions. Most spoke willingly with The Globe, but some, including Winnipeg and Calgary, refused to respond to questions on the matter.

    The practice typically involves an officer stopping a community member, questioning them and entering information into a computer database.

    Read more at: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/does-carding-occur-across-canada/article25832607/

  • Carding and racial profiling: What does it mean to these Toronto men?

    CHRIS YOUNG, Special to The Globe and Mail

    While the debate around carding was at its peak earlier this summer, photojournalist Chris Young spoke with members of Toronto's black community about the police practice. Opponents of carding say it unfairly targets racial minorities, that it amounts to racial profiling.

    http://beta.images.theglobeandmail.com/static/folio/carding/march.jpg

    "I wanted to hear from the people who were affected by the practice of carding, to open up a narrative without politicking or rhetoric," says Mr. Young. He asked them: Tell us how racial profiling has affected you.

    Read more at: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/what-does-carding-mean-to-you/article25990321/

  • Carding and street checks: What they're saying in Hamilton and other cities

    By Kelly Bennett, CBC

    Cities across southern Ontario are debating a controversial tool police use to solve and prevent crimes. It's called "carding" in Toronto and "street checks" elsewhere. The practice is a means of documenting interactions police officers have with people on the street who may not be under investigation or witness to a crime, and then logging that information in a database.

    http://www.cbc.ca/polopoly_fs/1.2856518.1417464961!/fileImage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/16x9_620/sandra-wilson-hamilton-police-service-community-relations.jpg

    In Hamilton, the discussion heads to an oversight board meeting for the Hamilton Police this Thursday. A representative of an anti-racism activism group called "Black, Brown, Red Lives Matter" will call for more clarity about street checks and raise concerns about the potential for police racial bias in determining whom to stop and question.

    Elsewhere in the province, mayors and police chiefs have been weighing in on the practice of "carding or "street checks". But to this point in Hamilton, activists and a councillor have been the loudest voices in the conversation. How important a tool is it? Police statistics show in Hamilton there are 10 to 15 street checks daily.

    Police rely on these contacts and conversations, which they say are not done randomly, to proactively lead them to answers on crimes nearby. Critics of the practice say it infringes on citizens' rights to privacy and may impact certain people, like visible minorities, more than others.

    Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/news/carding-and-street-checks-what-they-re-saying-in-hamilton-and-other-cities-1.3124439

  • Carding and Toronto police practices called into question

    By Thomas Saczkowski

    Concerns continue to grow over carding practices in Toronto, specifically over how much data is being collected, and what this means for privacy, and how it is being used to disproportionately gather information on people of colour in Toronto.

    On Tuesday September 1 a community consultation about carding practices will be held in Toronto as part of a provincial initiative to review policing practices.

    http://torontoist.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/4736998014_1b057ab89f_z-640x427.jpg

    The high percentages and a clear relation between carding practices and the harassment of racialized people, specifically the Black community, was detailed extensively in an 2010 investigative report by the Toronto Star headed by Jim Rankin. Human Rights Commissions releases also show the disproportionate amount of data collected by the police on people of colour in Toronto.

    Read more at: http://rabble.ca/news/2015/08/carding-and-toronto-police-practices-spotlight#.VeXD5et0pfE.facebook

  • Carding controversy prompts talks between cabinet minister and Edmonton police chief

    By Andrea Huncar, CBC News

    Alberta Justice and Aboriginal Relations Minister Kathleen Ganley has initiated talks with Edmonton police Chief Rod Knecht after a CBC story about carding raised concerns of racial profiling.

    http://i.cbc.ca/1.3226713.1442242717!/fileImage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/16x9_620/edmonton-street-checks.jpg

    "Mostly I just want to know more information (about) what is going on and whether we have statistics on how this is being used, what the outcomes are," Ganley said prior to speaking with Knecht by phone Monday afternoon.

    Before their conversation, Ganley said it would be premature to launch a formal review because she is unaware of any data suggesting there is a problem. She noted Ontario launched a review after statistics showed non-white people are disproportionately stopped with personal information documented in random police street checks.

    Critics in Edmonton's legal and aboriginal community say street checks, sometimes called carding, singles out aboriginal people and other racial groups.

    City police say they don't keep tallies by race but insist street checks are never racially motivated and are valuable for investigations.

    Figures provided by the police service to CBC show patrol officers card about 26,000 people overall on average a year, based on four years of statistics.

    Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/carding-controversy-prompts-talks-between-cabinet-minister-and-edmonton-police-chief-1.3227894

  • Carding gives fishing expedition licence to cops

    By Ajamu Nangwaya

    Ontario's government is a compliant partner in this scheme by regulating carding instead of ending the practice. I hope the individuals and groups that intend to offer suggestions to regulate carding are aware of the fact that they will be serving as collaborators and legitimizers.

    http://www.nothirdsolution.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/statistics.jpg

    The only option available to people who are really opposed to carding is a boycott of the consultation process and deny the regulations the legitimacy that the Wynne regime is seeking. Since the termination of carding is a principled demand, let provincial government go ahead and impose it on us.

    We ought to resist carding by developing Free2Go campaigns, which would empower people to stop sharing their personal information with the police.

    We should demand the full menu of human rights and civil liberties and not settle for crumbs from the government of Ontario and its enablers. We should not serve as willing accomplices in our dehumanization and oppression.

    See more at: http://sharenews.com/carding-gives-fishing-expedition-licence-to-cops/

  • Carding in Blackface: On Mark Saunders and “Diversity” in the TPS

    By Ellie Adekur-Carlson

    When Mark Saunders and Peter Sloly were shortlisted as candidates for Chief Bill Blair's job, it struck up a city-wide dialogue around diversity and the role of a Black police chief in tackling issues of anti-Black racism within the Toronto Police Service. Communities were proud to watch, for the first time, as men of colour rose through the ranks of the TPS, and when Mark Saunders was sworn-in, excited to begin unpacking issues of racial profiling and police violence in our city.

    mark saunders kevin van paasen (the globe and mail)

    Mark Saunders is a Black face in a traditionally white space, but the celebration is cut short when his approach to policing upholds many of the same campaigns that disproportionately target and oppress communities of colour. Saunders has been part (and too often in charge) of divisions within the police service that, historically and currently, target and harass young men and women of colour, and instil in us a sense of fear when we think about policing.

    What we are now learning is that putting a Black man in charge is not enough to meaningfully combat anti-Black racism. Saunders' Blackness is a symbolic victory for diversity, but it doesn't translate into tangible gains for communities of colour across the city; his swearing-in was not followed by meaningful policy change, nor even an acknowledgement of anti-Black racism in carding policies that, to date, have logged more encounters with young Black men than the actual population of young Black men in Toronto. For this reason, the conversation isn't and cannot be about diversity within the TPS. We need a larger discussion around racism, classism and the adversarial relationship between the TPS and working-class communities in Toronto.

    Carding—a practice that parallels the stop-and-frisk mandate of the NYPD—is a pre-emptive policing strategy that looks to tackle crime before it occurs in communities through indiscriminate, unwarranted contact with residents. The practice is loaded with issues of race- and class-based profiling. We now know that certain kinds of people in the city of Toronto are systematically stopped under these policies. Young men and women of colour are stopped and interrogated, with intimate details about our lives documented and logged in an expansive database. These encounters are deceptive, intimidating, and often degrading—creating a feeling that you can't say "no", because the police have guns and are largely unaccountable to anyone for the injuries they inflict.

    When you're carded, officers rarely inform you of your right to leave and demand intimate details about you, your intentions, and your background. When you hesitate, or refuse to give this information, officers bend the law to obtain it, threatening charges of trespassing, loitering, or officer baiting. Too often they resort to physical violence to get it, understanding that the complaint process is an inaccessible one, and that even when civilians do file complaints related to officer misconduct, rarely is the officer disciplined for this kind of violence.*

    Read more: http://basicsnews.ca/carding-in-blackface-on-mark-saunders-and-diversity-in-the-tps/

    When Mark Saunders and Peter Sloly were shortlisted as candidates for Chief Bill Blair’s job, it struck up a city-wide dialogue around diversity and the role of a Black police chief in tackling issues of anti-Black racism within the Toronto Police Service. Communities were proud to watch, for the first time, as men of colour rose through the ranks of the TPS, and when Mark Saunders was sworn-in, excited to begin unpacking issues of racial profiling and police violence in our city.

    Mark Saunders is a Black face in a traditionally white space, but the celebration is cut short when his approach to policing upholds many of the same campaigns that disproportionately target and oppress communities of colour. Saunders has been part (and too often in charge) of divisions within the police service that, historically and currently, target and harass young men and women of colour, and instil in us a sense of fear when we think about policing.

    What we are now learning is that putting a Black man in charge is not enough to meaningfully combat anti-Black racism.  Saunders’ Blackness is a symbolic victory for diversity, but it doesn’t translate into tangible gains for communities of colour across the city; his swearing-in was not followed by meaningful policy change, nor even an acknowledgement of anti-Black racism in carding policies that, to date, have logged more encounters with young Black men than the actual population of young Black men in Toronto.  For this reason, the conversation isn’t and cannot be about diversity within the TPS. We need a larger discussion around racism, classism and the adversarial relationship between the TPS and working-class communities in Toronto.

    Carding—a practice that parallels the stop-and-frisk mandate of the NYPD—is a pre-emptive policing strategy that looks to tackle crime before it occurs in communities through indiscriminate, unwarranted contact with residents. The practice is loaded with issues of race- and class-based profiling. We now know that certain kinds of people in the city of Toronto are systematically stopped under these policies. Young men and women of colour are stopped and interrogated, with intimate details about our lives documented and logged in an expansive database. These encounters are deceptive, intimidating, and often degrading—creating a feeling that you can’t say “no”, because the police have guns and are largely unaccountable to anyone for the injuries they inflict.

    When you’re carded, officers rarely inform you of your right to leave and demand intimate details about you, your intentions, and your background. When you hesitate, or refuse to give this information, officers bend the law to obtain it, threatening charges of trespassing, loitering, or officer baiting. Too often they resort to physical violence to get it, understanding that the complaint process is an inaccessible one, and that even when civilians do file complaints related to officer misconduct, rarely is the officer disciplined for this kind of violence.*

    - See more at: http://basicsnews.ca/carding-in-blackface-on-mark-saunders-and-diversity-in-the-tps/#sthash.S7wmNJl5.dpuf
  • Carding in Hamilton: 5 things we learned

    Kelly Bennett, CBC News

    Visible minorities, especially black people, are disproportionately street checked

    http://www.cbc.ca/polopoly_fs/1.2856518.1417464961!/fileImage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/16x9_620/sandra-wilson-hamilton-police-service-community-relations.jpg

    Police have been saying for years — as recently as the chief's comments in June — they don't keep race-based statistics. Keeping that data would mean the cops could provide the kind of breakdown that has led to criticisms in Toronto, Kingston and Ottawa.

    But we learned Thursday that they do keep race data and identifiers when they stop someone; they just haven't before analyzed that data.

    Visible minorities make up about 15.7 per cent of Hamilton's population, according to 2011 Census numbers the Hamilton Police cited Thursday. But 25 per cent of street checks were conducted on visible minorities between 2010 and 2014.

    The rate is especially disproportionate for black people, who made up 3.2 per cent of Hamilton's population in 2011. Between 11 and 14 per cent of the street checks done in Hamilton were on black people between 2010 and 2014 -- a rate three to four times the population.

    Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/news/carding-in-hamilton-5-things-we-learned-1.3166501

  • Carding is premised on racial stereotyping

    By Lennox Farrell

    By LENNOX FARRELL


    Carding is a phenomenon that is multi-dimensional, has several moving parts, and varying perspectives. From a bird’s-eye view, as a crime-fighting policy it is counter-Constitutional. From ground-level as a crime-fighting procedure, it is counter-productive. From our historic struggles in the trenches of anti-Black racism, it is premised on racial stereotyping.

    No matter how one tries to slice and dice it, carding – Toronto’s officially endorsed police practice primarily of stopping Black males in order to stop crime – is “policing by skin-colour stereotyping”. Containment on the street, carding is premised on the assumption that crime has a colour. It effectively places all Black youth “on parole”. Therefore, “stopping enough Black males, will reduce crime” is the new mantra. Our new Police Chief, Mark Saunders, recently installed with such aplomb, has gone even further. To paraphrase him, “without carding, crime will increase”.

    Based on who he is and what he represents, does his tenure so far mirror the African proverb: “When the trees saw the axe coming into the forest, some of them said, ‘it’s O.K., the handle is one of us’”? I hope not.

    Stopping Black males in Toronto the Good has always been police practice. If these stoppages – in addition to periodic police shootings – have not yet reduced “crime” why would the increased and specific targeting of Black males now make a seismic difference? Some of the significant challenges emanating from his remarks are commented on later.

    However, so widespread is this practice now, according to studies done on carding by the Toronto Star, the number of Black males carded – averaging 370,000 cards per year since 2008 – outnumbers the actual number of Black males in Toronto. According to Stats Can 2011, the total Black population of Toronto was 7.2 per cent of the whole, or 397,975 (males and females). In other words, because so many Black males have been stopped on multiple occasions – one young reporter is recently on record of having been stopped 50 times – the total number of cardings outnumbers the total number of Black males (and females) in Toronto.

    - See more at: http://sharenews.com/carding-is-premised-on-racial-stereotyping/#sthash.1m8Q36lr.dpuf


    http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/news/insight/2014/07/26/carding_drops_but_proportion_of_blacks_stopped_by_toronto_police_rises/feacarding2013.jpg

    Read more: http://sharenews.com/carding-is-premised-on-racial-stereotyping/

    By LENNOX FARRELL


    Carding is a phenomenon that is multi-dimensional, has several moving parts, and varying perspectives. From a bird’s-eye view, as a crime-fighting policy it is counter-Constitutional. From ground-level as a crime-fighting procedure, it is counter-productive. From our historic struggles in the trenches of anti-Black racism, it is premised on racial stereotyping.

    No matter how one tries to slice and dice it, carding – Toronto’s officially endorsed police practice primarily of stopping Black males in order to stop crime – is “policing by skin-colour stereotyping”. Containment on the street, carding is premised on the assumption that crime has a colour. It effectively places all Black youth “on parole”. Therefore, “stopping enough Black males, will reduce crime” is the new mantra. Our new Police Chief, Mark Saunders, recently installed with such aplomb, has gone even further. To paraphrase him, “without carding, crime will increase”.

    Based on who he is and what he represents, does his tenure so far mirror the African proverb: “When the trees saw the axe coming into the forest, some of them said, ‘it’s O.K., the handle is one of us’”? I hope not.

    Stopping Black males in Toronto the Good has always been police practice. If these stoppages – in addition to periodic police shootings – have not yet reduced “crime” why would the increased and specific targeting of Black males now make a seismic difference? Some of the significant challenges emanating from his remarks are commented on later.

    However, so widespread is this practice now, according to studies done on carding by the Toronto Star, the number of Black males carded – averaging 370,000 cards per year since 2008 – outnumbers the actual number of Black males in Toronto. According to Stats Can 2011, the total Black population of Toronto was 7.2 per cent of the whole, or 397,975 (males and females). In other words, because so many Black males have been stopped on multiple occasions – one young reporter is recently on record of having been stopped 50 times – the total number of cardings outnumbers the total number of Black males (and females) in Toronto.

    - See more at: http://sharenews.com/carding-is-premised-on-racial-stereotyping/#sthash.1m8Q36lr.dpuf
  • Carding: Canada's version of 'stop and frisk'

    By Amanda Warren

    Last week, we showed how police brutality is one of America's most popular exports to the UK. It's gaining ground in Canada too, with their own cases of deaths at the hands of police, brutality, tasering, raids and unnecessary animal killings. We just don't always hear about it, what with our own average of three citizen deaths a day by police. It's hard to beat the U.S. at a Police State, but Canada is on its way to full emulation.

    http://i.ytimg.com/vi/716B2xEjE4s/0.jpg

    In the U.S. getting "carded" - asked for ID when buying alcohol or cigarettes - can either be an annoying occurrence or a little self-esteem boost depending on age. "Carding," however, is an ominous word in Canada because it's their word for "stop and frisk" which is regarded as controversial. It's conducted differently there (see below).

    The efforts to unite and stop police brutality and press for accountability have been fragmented by blurring the actions and highlighting them as racism. However, when it comes to carding, race does play a role because it includes profiling the next victim of harassment, just as in stop and frisk.

    Toronto's new and first black police chief is finding it a little difficult to explain to the entire community why carding and profiling are "necessary."

    Carding is also called "street checks" by police, involves interrogation and ends with request for ID and recording the person's information. But the ID is not why it's called carding.

    Read more at: http://www.sott.net/article/296698-Carding-Canadas-version-of-stop-and-frisk

  • CBC Metro Morning: Twitter Conversation on a Black Police Chief

    With protests growing around carding and racial profiling, does Toronto need a black Police Chief? 2 different perspectives on this at 6:10

      1. 3:08 AM - 15 Apr 2015 · Details
        " data-mentions="metromorning CBC" data-component-context="replies" data-you-follow="false" data-follows-you="false" data-you-block="false">

        That awkward moment u realize has no friggin' clue how racism works.

    1. Tune in - you'll hear a passionate argument from each side in 2 minutes.


    http://www.cbc.ca/hamilton/features/mentalhealth101/images/metro.jpg

    Read the twitter conversation: https://twitter.com/metromorning/status/588277249994031104

  • CBC Metro Morning: What difference will a black police chief make?

    Two candidates rumoured to be top contenders to replace Police Chief Bill Blair also happen to be black men. But what difference does race make?


    http://www.ctvnews.ca/polopoly_fs/1.2335588.1429539468!/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_960/image.jpg


    Listen to the interview: http://www.cbc.ca/player/Radio/Local+Shows/Ontario/Metro+Morning/ID/2664187492/

  • Chief Blair gives finger to the Black community

    By PATRICK HUNTER

    On his way out the door, the Chief of the Toronto Police Service (TPS) has essentially given the finger to the Black community. In spite of your protests and condemnations, Black community, the Toronto Police Service will continue to stop and record information about community members, and we have the power to do so.

    http://storage.torontosun.com/v1/blogs-prod-photos/e/4/2/b/7/e42b7c9b614ab97a4465dc26f591337f.jpg?stmp=1337598864

    Sure, there are updated guidelines to clarify when, how and why “community engagements” should take place. The police officer, or the “Service member”, has been given specific instructions as to what constitutes a community engagement so that the community member is clear that he or she is not being detained – including psychological detention. But, the Service member is not required to tell the community member that he or she has the right to end the “engagement” if he or she so chooses.

    Now, it is possible that if there are witnesses around, and someone decides to end an engagement, he or she can do so without fear. What happens if that young person is encountered alone? As an older person, I would probably have the guts to ask if I were being detained. If the officer says no, I could, and would be within my rights to say that this engagement has ended and walk away. Can you imagine a younger person saying that without fear?

    Read more: http://sharenews.com/chief-blair-gives-finger-to-the-black-community/

  • City Councillor Calls on London Police to Suspend Carding Program

    By AM980 - News, Talk, Sports

    Days after the provincial government announced it would be revamping "carding" procedures for police departments in the province, a London city councillor is calling on the London Police Service to suspend the process altogether, suggesting it may be race-motivated.

    http://storage.lfpress.com/v1/dynamic_resize/sws_path/suns-prod-images/1297714279056_ORIGINAL.jpg?quality=80&size=650x&stmp=1434673600634

    Carding is a practice whereby police officers record information about people, vehicles and properties though details like names, addresses, date of birth, races, and identifiable markings of community members. The interactions are voluntary, through critics argue that people may not know they have the right to decline to answer questions.

    Ward 3 Councillor Mo Salih, who is black himself, says that blacks are disproportionately exposed to the LPS's street checking program.

    Numbers from the LPS show that in 2014, of the 14,000 people ended into the service's database, 71.2 per cent were white and 7.7 per cent were black.

    Based on 2011 census numbers, the most recent available, London's white population was 82 percent, while the city's black population was only 2.2 per cent, which Salih says reinforces what he's heard from black constituents impacted by the process.

    Read more at: http://www.am980.ca/2015/06/18/city-councillor-calls-on-london-police-to-suspend-carding-program/

  • Community members threaten legal action if new 'carding' policy approved

    by Tammie Sutherland and Christine Chubb

    A group of concerned community members are threatening to take legal action if changes to the police ‘carding’ policy are approved.

    Last month Toronto police and their board announced the new policy aimed at preventing discrimination against the public and addressing the controversial policy.

    But some insist the new policy takes a massive step backward in relieving the tension and controversy surrounding the issue.

    http://www.citynews.ca/wp-content/blogs.dir/sites/10/2014/11/593482582001_3890639814001_video-still-for-video-3890614619001-878x494.jpg

    “The current Toronto Police Services Board has declared war on us,” Valerie Steele with the Black Action Defense Committee, explained.

    “It is appalling and disgraceful that the outgoing Chief of Police, in cahoots with mayor John Tory and his friend Andrew Pringle, believes that knowledgeable community resisters, like myself, would not find totally unpalatable this proposed racial profiling policy.”

    In April, the Toronto Police Services Board unanimously approved a ‘carding’ policy that included making it mandatory for officers to hand out receipts after every interaction and officers had to make it very clear that these conversations were voluntary.

    Read more (watch the video): http://www.citynews.ca/2015/04/14/community-members-threaten-legal-action-if-new-carding-policy-approved/

  • Concerns raised about carding info stored on police database

    Some time after Christopher Williams was carded by police, he went through the process of finding out exactly what information they had about him on their database.http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/news/gta/2013/03/27/police_carding_human_rights_commission_offers_help_analyzing_legitimacy_of_street_checks/police_carding.jpg.size.xxlarge.promo.jpgView the video: http://www.citynews.ca/2015/05/13/concerns-raised-about-info-stored-on-carding-database/