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  • Law student creates app to monitor interactions with police

    By Tom Godfrey

    As Toronto police and the Ontario government review the carding by police of young Black men, some high-tech tools have been created to alert users of their rights when pulled over by officers.

    http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/uploads/2015/7/3/legal-swipe.jpg

    Christien Levien of Brampton has developed a free application for smartphones that community residents can download to monitor or record their interactions with police. The app automatically uploads the data to a mailbox that can send emergency messages to loved ones.

    "It is designed to be fast and simple, so that it can be used in real time during a police encounter," Levien said, adding the device's real value comes before a tense situation when information is required quickly.

    The app, that was launched last month, has been so successful that its servers crashed due to thousands of users in the first week.

    Levien has launched an online crowdfunding campaign to reboot the free application and make some badly-needed updates.

    He said more than 5,000 people downloaded the app, called Legalswipe, after it was launched, causing the servers to go down.

    Read more: http://sharenews.com/law-student-creates-app-to-monitor-interactions-with-police-2/

  • London’s rate of conducting street checks is three times that of Ottawa and Hamilton

    By Jennifer O'brien, London Free Press

    London police conducted street checks last year at a rate more than triple that of police in Ottawa and Hamilton and more than five times that of Windsor, figures from the cities suggest.

    London police ride bikes along Dundas Street. The force’s rate of street checks has come under scrutiny. (MIKE HENSEN, The London Free Press)

    London police conducted 8,400 such street checks — or carding, as it's popularly known — in 2014, meaning at a rate of about 23 checks for every 1,000 people.

    In Hamilton and Ottawa, by comparison, both larger cities, the rate worked out to seven or fewer checks per 1,000 people, while in Windsor it was 4.5.

    While those numbers are adding more fuel to the fire of Coun. Mo Salih, who's calling on the police services board to review its policies about street checks, police Chief John Pare says he isn't concerned about the apparent differences in use of the information-­gathering tool in London and other cities.

    "I don't know what their practices are. I can only speak to ours," Pare said Thursday. "It is used by officers to document information. We use it for intelligence, for public safety."

    Pare said it may be that other cities are gathering the same data differently than London does.

    Street checks — known as carding, because historically the information was kept on contact cards — is the police practice of recording and storing information about people, vehicles and locations that aren't involved in criminal investigations, to help build up a database police can draw upon later.

    The controversial practice has come under a harsh spotlight in Ontario, especially in Toronto where critics say too often racial minorities are stopped for routine carding and profiled. The provincial government is moving to standardize how police forces can gather such information.

    Last year, London police conducted about 8,400 street checks, involving 14,000 people.

    By comparison, Ottawa police ran about 6,000 checks and Windsor police fewer than 1,000.

    Read more at:http://www.lfpress.com/2015/06/24/londons-rate-of-conducting-street-checks-is-three-times-that-of-ottawa-and-hamilton

  • Londoners to get say on police carding

    By Jennifer O'Brien, The London Free Press

    http://storage.lfpress.com/v1/dynamic_resize/sws_path/suns-prod-images/1297738443521_ORIGINAL.jpg?quality=80&size=650x&stmp=1439945655781

    Londoners will get to weigh in on the controversial police practice known as carding as Ontario moves to regulate how police forces in the province ­randomly stop people to gather information.

    But one outspoken critic, who calls London's use of carding "on steroids" compared to other cities, says the answer isn't to regulate the so-called street checks by police, but to scrap them.

    "To regulate carding is akin to putting lipstick on a pig," said Ajamu Nangwaya, an organizer with the Toronto-based Network for the Elimination of Police Violence.

    "Carding is wrong. Carding must end. Period," he said.

    "It's a fundamental right of citizens not to be unduly stopped by police. You are not a suspect in a crime, yet you are being stopped, questioned documented and your information stored."

    Feeling the heat over a backlash to carding, especially in Toronto where racial minorities say they're disproportionately stopped by officers, Ontario's Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services has scheduled a five-city round of public hearings, including in London, to gauge public opinion before the province announces promised new regulations to control and standardize the practice.

    Carding involves stopping and questioning people who aren't under arrest or facing charges nand taking down information to help build police databases.

    Read more at: http://www.lfpress.com/2015/08/18/londoners-to-get-say-on-police-carding

  • Mayor Tory: When deeds fail to reflect words

    By Patrick Hunter

    If it hasn't become obvious by now, one of my impressions of Mayor John Tory is that he loves to talk. He has to give a dissertation with every answer. The problem with that is what he says is not always reflected in what he does.

    http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/news/gta/2015/06/19/dear-mr-tory-we-expect-so-much-more-from-you-james/john-tory.jpg

    On that fateful Sunday, June 7, when the mayor announced his Damascus turn-around, he said in part: "And the impact has been magnified by my very longstanding, close and mutually-respectful relationship with our own Black community. I don't have a relationship that is as important, or any more important to me, than the relationship, the friendship that I have built up over many years with that community," as reported in the Toronto Star.

    The words "mutually-respectful relationship" is worth noting because it speaks very candidly to my point.

    When Tory took office, one of the significant changes he made to the Toronto Police Services Board (TPSB) was to remove the lone Black member and vice-Chair, Councillor Michael Thompson. He placed himself on the Board, which is within his purview.

    Over the past few weeks we have seen the results of why he wanted to be in the mix on the Board himself. He has no doubt had significant influence on who was appointed Chief. Then there was his confusing defence of carding, initially, and then the about face. And I have that feeling that he was influential in Board Chair Alok Mukherjee's decision to step down early.

    Read more at: http://sharenews.com/mayor-tory-when-deeds-fail-to-reflect-words/

  • Media Advisory: A Black Police Chief in Toronto: Friend or Foe?

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                                                                                                      DATE: April 13, 2015          

                    

    A Black Police Chief in Toronto: Friend or Foe?

    TORONTO, ON - Jane Finch Action Against Poverty (JFAAP) and the Network for the Elimination of Police Violence (NEPV) invite you to a panel discussion on the relevance of an Afrikan Canadian police chief to the experiences of police violence in racialized working-class communities and the actions that we need to embrace to resist the brutal behaviour of the Toronto Police Service.

    http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/news/city_hall/2015/03/27/two-deputies-in-spotlight-in-search-for-a-diverse-police-chief/cops-compositejpg.jpg.size.xxlarge.letterbox.jpg

            WHO:    Ellie Adekur Carlson, graduate student, trade unionist, and Chair, NEPV;
                          Butterfly Gopaul, JFAAP organizer; Kabir Joshi-Vijayan, longstanding
                          organizer against police violence and organizer with the Marcus Garvey
                          School Program

        WHERE:  Yorkgate Mall, 1 Yorkgate Blvd, Toronto, Seneca College in Yorkgate
                         (north west corner of Jane Street and Finch Avenue); Room 218/219 (2nd
    floor of the mall)

            WHAT:  Forum on police violence and the relevance of a Black police chief

            WHEN: Wednesday, April 15, 2015, 6:00 - 8:00 pm

    There is no consensus within the Afrikan Canadian community on the usefulness of the possibility of appointing a Black man as the next police chief of the Toronto Police Service. The experiences of Afrikan Americans reveal that the presence of Afrikan American police chiefs in major American cities has not substantively affected the prevalence of police violence.

    The history of police reform in the city of Toronto has made it clear that change comes from below. The difference-maker in forcing the agenda of police accountability on the political directorate is grassroots organizing of campaigns, projects, or programmes by the people disproportionately affected by state violence.

    However, hope is the stock-in-trade of the voiceless or the socially marginalized. Therefore, some people feel invested in the promise of an Afrikan police chief in Toronto. This public education forum will engage in a critical discussion about what must be done to resist police violence in our communities.

    -30-

    CONTACT: Ellie Adekur-Carlson, NEPV Chairperson,

    PHONE:    647-882-6581  
    WEB:        
    http://NEPV.org
    EMAIL:      
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • Media Advisory: A Black Police Chief in Toronto: Friend or Foe?

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                                                                                                         DATE: April 13, 2015          

                    

    A Black Police Chief in Toronto: Friend or Foe?

     

    TORONTO, ON - Jane Finch Action Against Poverty (JFAAP) and the Network for the Elimination of Police Violence (NEPV) invite you to a panel discussion on the relevance of an Afrikan Canadian police chief to the experiences of police violence in racialized working-class communities and the actions that we need to embrace to resist the brutal behaviour of the Toronto Police Service.

     http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/news/city_hall/2015/03/27/two-deputies-in-spotlight-in-search-for-a-diverse-police-chief/cops-compositejpg.jpg.size.xxlarge.letterbox.jpg

           

    WHO:    Ellie Adekur Carlson, graduate student, trade unionist, and Chair, NEPV; Butterfly Gopaul, JFAAP organizer; Kabir Joshi-Vijayan, longstanding
                  organizer against police violence and organizer with the Marcus Garvey School Program

    WHERE: Yorkgate Mall, 1 Yorkgate Blvd, Toronto, Seneca College in Yorkgate (north west corner of Jane Street and Finch Avenue); Room 218/219 (2nd floor of the mall)

    WHAT:  Forum on police violence and the relevance of a Black police chief

    WHEN: Wednesday, April 15, 2015, 6:00 - 8:00 pm


    There is no consensus within the Afrikan Canadian community on the usefulness of the possibility of appointing a Black man as the next police chief of the Toronto Police Service. The experiences of Afrikan Americans reveal that the presence of Afrikan American police chiefs in major American cities has not substantively affected the prevalence of police violence.

     

    The history of police reform in the city of Toronto has made it clear that change comes from below. The difference-maker in forcing the agenda of police accountability on the political directorate is grassroots organizing of campaigns, projects, or programmes by the people disproportionately affected by state violence.

     

    However, hope is the stock-in-trade of the voiceless or the socially marginalized. Therefore, some people feel invested in the promise of an Afrikan police chief in Toronto. This public education forum will engage in a critical discussion about what must be done to resist police violence in our communities.

     

    -30-

    CONTACT: Ellie Adekur-Carlson, NEPV Chairperson,

    PHONE:    647-882-6581  
    WEB:        
    http://NEPV.org
    EMAIL:      
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • NEPV: Organizing Resistance to Toronto Police Violence 19 March 2015

    The Network for the Elimination of Police Violence organized a protest against police violence on March 19, 2015. The protest took place at Toronto's police headquarters at 40 College Street.

    Watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=depB6-N4Ra4

  • NEPV: Organizing Resistance to Toronto Police Violence 19 March 2015

    Network to Eliminate Police Violence (NEPV) organizer Ellie Adekur-Carlson joined us for the Premiere of What World Do You Live In? and has earned our undying gratitude by helping to spread the message ever since. On March 19, while several other activists made presentations inside the monthly Toronto Police Services Board meeting, NEPV radicals outside insist that organizing powerful grassroots resistance is the only real way forward.

    http://toronto.ctvnews.ca/polopoly_fs/1.2429711.1434670187!/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_960/image.jpg

    Ajamu Nangwaya summarizes it this way: “We're here, not begging for justice from the forces behind us, but to serve notice that we are going to start organizing in our communities to fight police violence.”Ellie kicks things off explaining that we're “protesting the rampant use of carding in communities across the city.” Carding, is Toronto Police's euphemism for what's known more widely as stop and frisk practices. “Those who are affected by this the most are afraid to come out,” she continues, noting that illegal police “strip searches take place daily” as a form of intimidation for those targeted by police.

    John Clarke from OCAP (critical in our previous week's release SAFE PARK) takes centre stage in solidarity with the 'organize, don't beg' message. In a racist and capitalist society, he insists, police reinforce those values very intentionally. The escalation in police violence matches a particular political need for increased social control in a time of austerity. The result is a “tinder box” that could blow at any moment. This is “not about liberal fuzziness,” he notes to applause. The “answer is for communities to organize resistance.”Ellie takes the mic again. There's a “meeting in there, but we live there and live with those decisions. That's why we are out here.”

    Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=depB6-N4Ra4

  • New chief should test his support in service

    By ARNOLD A. AUGUSTE, Publisher/Senior Editor

    It has been suggested to me that members of the community, meaning the Black community, should support the city's new police chief.

    http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/news/city_hall/2015/04/29/meet-mark-saunders-bill-blair-redux-james/saunders-and-tory.jpg.size.xxlarge.letterbox.jpg

    The message, I guess, is that because he is Black, he deserves our support. It might also be meant to suggest that if he fails, it would look bad on us.

    I don't have a problem supporting him. In fact, most of us would want to support him. But we would want to know that he is also going to be supporting us; that he would be the catalyst for change in the way policing affects Black people in this city.

    It is time we stop supporting people just because they share our skin colour. We need more than that. We need to know that they share our values; our concerns; our fears, our sense of place in this society and, when placed in a position to make a difference, are willing to step up.

    We need our teachers to pay special attention to the education of Black children. We need Black police officers to ensure the rights of Black people in their custody are respected and to lead by example. We need our judges, justices of the peace, lawyers – both defence and crown – to do all they can where possible to avoid the warehousing and further criminalizing of Black youth in correctional facilities by finding alternative solutions instead of just going with the flow.

    We need our politicians to speak up for the community and speak out on issues affecting the community. Having a Black face in Queen's Park is not enough. We need a Black voice. Or voices. We need to know that when issues arise that affect us, there is someone in the room who has our back.

    http://storage.torontosun.com/v1/dynamic_resize/sws_path/suns-prod-images/1297690009632_ORIGINAL.jpg?quality=80&size=650x

    We need those people appointed to important positions – committees, boards, commissions, etc. – in government and the private sector to understand that maybe, just maybe, those who made those appointments might really want to get our unique perspective and not just to hear what they can hear from anyone else. Speak up for the community. Otherwise you are useless to them... and to us.

    What is the Association of Black Law Enforcement's (ABLE) position on the issue of carding and the over-policing of Black youth in this city?

    Why haven't we heard from the multitude of Black pastors, priests and other clergy in our community on issues affecting us? Aren't their members vulnerable? Don't they have young people in their places of worship who are affected by all the issues that affect the rest of the community? We know they do speak out on issues that affect other communities. What about ours?

    Read more: http://sharenews.com/new-chief-should-test-his-support-in-service/#sthash.5ZFkhoJg.dpuf

    By ARNOLD A. AUGUSTE, Publisher/Senior Editor


    It has been suggested to me that members of the community, meaning the Black community, should support the city’s new police chief.

    The message, I guess, is that because he is Black, he deserves our support. It might also be meant to suggest that if he fails, it would look bad on us.

    I don’t have a problem supporting him. In fact, most of us would want to support him. But we would want to know that he is also going to be supporting us; that he would be the catalyst for change in the way policing affects Black people in this city.

    It is time we stop supporting people just because they share our skin colour. We need more than that. We need to know that they share our values; our concerns; our fears, our sense of place in this society and, when placed in a position to make a difference, are willing to step up.

    We need our teachers to pay special attention to the education of Black children. We need Black police officers to ensure the rights of Black people in their custody are respected and to lead by example. We need our judges, justices of the peace, lawyers – both defence and crown – to do all they can where possible to avoid the warehousing and further criminalizing of Black youth in correctional facilities by finding alternative solutions instead of just going with the flow.

    We need our politicians to speak up for the community and speak out on issues affecting the community. Having a Black face in Queen’s Park is not enough. We need a Black voice. Or voices. We need to know that when issues arise that affect us, there is someone in the room who has our back.

    We need those people appointed to important positions – committees, boards, commissions, etc. – in government and the private sector to understand that maybe, just maybe, those who made those appointments might really want to get our unique perspective and not just to hear what they can hear from anyone else. Speak up for the community. Otherwise you are useless to them … and to us.

    What is the Association of Black Law Enforcement’s (ABLE) position on the issue of carding and the over-policing of Black youth in this city?

    Why haven’t we heard from the multitude of Black pastors, priests and other clergy in our community on issues affecting us? Aren’t their members vulnerable? Don’t they have young people in their places of worship who are affected by all the issues that affect the rest of the community? We know they do speak out on issues that affect other communities. What about ours?

    - See more at: http://sharenews.com/new-chief-should-test-his-support-in-service/#sthash.5ZFkhoJg.dpuf
  • On organizing against police violence: Mobilization is not enough

    By Ajamu Nangwaya

    The following actions are offered as a path to organizing the community against police violence and they ought to be executed as part of an integrated and comprehensive approach:

    1. Form local community-controlled organizations that organize, educate and mobilize against police violence. In the past, we have neglected to organize local communities and equip them with the knowledge, skills, attitude and material resources to tackle police violence.

    2. Develop "Know Your Rights" educational programmes so that the members of the community are aware of the full range of their rights and the information that they can legally withhold from the police. Often-times members of our communities consent to the search of their person and possession as well as give the police personal information out of ignorance of the dictates of the law.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/441689490893971456/_jP5JdKa_400x400.jpeg

    3. Organize Copwatch programmes that visually record the interaction of the police with members of the community. The Black Panther Party was the originator of the practice of observing and recording the action of the police. We should acquire the audio-visual resources to document acts of police violence. The negative reaction of many cops to being filmed interacting with the public is an indication that they might have something to conceal from us.

    4. Create smart phone applications that record acts of police violence. The New York Civil Liberties Union has created a "stop and frisk" phone application that films police action, alerts users to the location of an incident of police violence and generates a survey to document the details of the contact with the police.

    Read more: http://rabble.ca/news/2013/08/on-organizing-against-police-violence-mobilization-not-enough

  • On organizing against police violence: Mobilization is not enough

    By Ajamu Nangwaya

    The following actions are offered as a path to organizing the community against police violence and they ought to be executed as part of an integrated and comprehensive approach:

     1. Form local community-controlled organizations that organize, educate and mobilize against police violence. In the past, we have neglected to organize local communities and equip them with the knowledge, skills, attitude and material resources to tackle police violence.

    2. Develop "Know Your Rights" educational programmes so that the members of the community are aware of the full range of their rights and the information that they can legally withhold from the police. Often-times members of our communities consent to the search of their person and possession as well as give the police personal information out of ignorance of the dictates of the law.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/441689490893971456/_jP5JdKa_400x400.jpeg

    3. Organize Copwatch programmes that visually record the interaction of the police with members of the community. The Black Panther Party was the originator of the practice of observing and recording the action of the police. We should acquire the audio-visual resources to document acts of police violence. The negative reaction of many cops to being filmed interacting with the public is an indication that they might have something to conceal from us.

    4. Create smart phone applications that record acts of police violence. The New York Civil Liberties Union has created a "stop and frisk" phone application that films police action, alerts users to the location of an incident of police violence and generates a survey to document the details of the contact with the police.

    Read more: http://rabble.ca/news/2013/08/on-organizing-against-police-violence-mobilization-not-enough

  • Onus on police to justify street checks

    Ottawa Sun Editorial

    Have you ever told a police officer "I'm done with this conversation," and simply walked away?

    http://storage.ottawasun.com/v1/dynamic_resize/sws_path/suns-prod-images/1297640891377_ORIGINAL.jpg?quality=80&size=650x

    Can you imagine doing it?

    Those defending the practice of police street checks or "carding" will, on occasion, point out that citizens have the right not to co-operate when stopped by police seeking their ID.

    But let's be honest: Treating a conversation between a 19-year-old and an Ottawa police officer as a voluntary exchange in which either could equally walk away ignores a blatant power imbalance.

    It's an inequality that underlies much of the debate around street checks, which have made headlines in Toronto but are also happening on the streets of Ottawa.

    On Tuesday, Community Safety Minister Yasir Naqvi announced the Liberals will move to regulate street checks provincewide. It's likely a well-intentioned effort.

    But perhaps it's time to go one step further and abandon the practice, period.

    Read more at: http://www.ottawasun.com/2015/06/16/onus-on-police-to-justify-street-checks

  • Ottawa police taking heat over street checks

    By Corey Larocque

    Ottawa police are coming under fire for so-called "carding" practices even though a recently released report shows they made 4,405 street-checks in 2014, compared to 8,240 in 2010.

    http://storage.ottawasun.com/v1/dynamic_resize/sws_path/suns-prod-images/1297728827161_ORIGINAL.jpg?quality=80&size=650x

    While a critic says the controversial practice unfairly singles people out based on their race, Acting Insp. Mark Patterson says street checks are still a valuable crime-fighting tool.

    "These street checks are an asset. It is a huge tool to us in terms of investigating and solving crimes," said Patterson, who wrote a report on how they've been used since 2010.

    Also known as "carding," a street check is when police record information about people they meet on the street -- including their race -- and file it away, hoping it might be helpful in a future investigation.

    But lawyer and civil liberties advocate Paul Champ said it's "shocking" how disproportionately blacks and Middle Eastern people are street-checked.

    In Ottawa, blacks account for 5% of the population but made up 20% of the people street-checked over the past five years. Middle Eastern people make up 3% of the population, but accounted for 14% of street checks.

    Read more at: http://m.ottawasun.com/2015/07/23/ottawa-police-taking-heat-over-street-checks

  • Ottawa street checks are the 'wild west,' lawyer says

    By John Willing

    A local criminal defence lawyer believes the police practice of doing street checks in Ottawa is worse than in it is in Toronto.

    Ottawa Police cruiser

    "In Toronto you had the mayor weigh in on it, you had the Toronto police services board actually try to implement some sort of policy and rule about it," Michael Spratt said Tuesday. "In Ottawa, it's the wild west, there are no rules, and it's a practice that's rampant here as well."

    Ottawa police have been building a street check policy and they plan to present it to the board when the proposed guidelines are ready. The province announced Tuesday it wants to standardize a street check policy across Ontario police forces.

    Spratt said a street check policy should require police to inform people what their rights are.

    Read more at: http://www.ottawasun.com/2015/06/16/ottawa-street-checks-are-the-wild-west-lawyer-says

  • Peaceful protest against police violence in Toronto

    By Francine Buchner

    A rally was held outside of police headquarters in downtown Toronto protesting against racist policing and the carding practice, on a day that the Toronto Police Services Board meet monthly in the hopes of bringing attention to their causes.


    On March 2 a Special Meeting on carding was to be had, but was postponed, “because they’re saying that the police chief and the Toronto Police Services Board are negotiating how they’re going to implement carding; not get rid of it, but how to implement a carding policy in this city,” says Ajamu Nangwaya, Network for the Elimination of Police Violence and the organiser of the rally.



    On their agenda this day was the likes of: the re-appointment of a Board member, a vendor of record for electrical services, various reports, a semi-annual write-off of uncollectable accounts receivable report, two death inquest reports for approval, etc., http://www.tpsb.ca/Board_Agenda_March_19.pdf.

    “We’re here because we want to give public notice to the police that we’re not going to tolerate police violence in our communities. It is through the organising in our communities that we will force change,” says Nangwaya. He says it is the radicalised working class communities that are being targeted.

    “Suspension is not enough because there’s no way that society would be tolerant of carding in Rosedale, in predominately white, upper class communities. It’s a fundamental violation of people’s right to give over information to police or for you to be stopped, questioned and carded,” says Nangwaya.

    Toronto chief of police, Bill Blair was supposed to file a report on his carding policy in December of last year, “in fact in January he said that carding has stopped. I don’t know where it’s stopped. I don’t know where they believe it’s stopped, but trust me, it hasn’t stopped. Carding is a violation of our rights,” says Vickie McPhee, Rights Watch Network.

    Read more: http://old.jamaica-gleaner.com/extra/article.php?id=4143

  • Peoples' Social Forum Toronto 2015 Kimalee Phillip

    Kimalee Phillip is an organizer with the Network for the Elimination of Police Violence. Keynote panel at the Peoples' Social in Toronto.

    7:30-9pm – Toronto PSF Keynote Panelwith Tantoo Cardinal, Kimalee Phillip, Hassan Husseini, Judy Rebick, Linda McQuaig and Syed Hussan (Ryerson University, George Vari Engineering and Computing Centre, 245 Church Street, ENG 103 Lecture Theater)

    http://i.ytimg.com/vi/Ep4gps8-rdg/maxresdefault.jpg

    Watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgGH9X_V9Mg&feature=youtu.be

  • Peterborough Police say street checks aka “carding” is indispensable

    By Pamela Vanmeer

    August 21, 2014 a rookie Peterborough cop stopped to chat with a couple of guys out walking the streets of Peterborough at 4am. The constable didn't know it at the time but she was talking to Steven Yearley. Yearly was convicted of a violent sexual assault in Huntsville in 2007. The victim was beaten so badly her friends did not recognize her. The rape lasted 15 minutes before the assailant was scared off by someone passing by. Yearley escaped from prison and went on a violent rampage stealing a Hydro One truck and breaking into a number of residences. He voluntarily chose to serve 100 percent of his sentence to avoid the restrictions of parole. But when he moved back to Peterborough police issued a public safety alert and placed restrictions on Yearley as a dangerous offender. Among them was to obey a curfew from 10 pm to 6 am.

    http://media.zuza.com/c/9/c990db33-2395-4b5b-bade-f72abaa6bcd1/peterborough_police_website___Content.jpg

    The cop didn't know who Yearley was because he'd grown his hair. She just saw a couple of guys "walking in a place where there was a number of break and enters recently." She says it was around 4 am and they seemed to be trying to evade her so she stopped them. She entered the details of the interaction on a contact card in the computer right down to the false name Yearley had given her. The next day one of the detectives was reading the information and recognized the alias and new exactly who it was. Steven Yearley was arrested for breaching this conditions. It was the second time he was charged with breaching conditions. A month before he was found with cocaine according to police.

    Deputy Chief Tim Farquharson says this is a perfect example of why streets checks or carding works. " This whole street check thing is part of intelligence lead policing, the proactive and the preventative piece and thats what we are paid to do"

    In 2014 Peterborough Police did 829 street checks and so far this year they've done 483. They collect information like name, age and date of birth if it's given. They write down a description of the person, what they were wearing, the date, time, location and circumstances that lead to the interaction. It's stored in a police data base.

    Read more at: http://www.vanmeerfreepress.com/peterborough-police-say-street-checks-aka-carding-is-indispensable/

  • Phone Cameras and Apps Help Speed Calls for Police Reform

    By

    The video of the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man by a white police officer in South Carolina is seen by some advocates of police reform as evidence of the rising power of technological weapons in their fight.

    That includes the smartphone camera, and with it, a growing number of apps produced by activists that streamline the process of capturing and broadcasting videos of police interacting with citizens.

    “A lot of times, until these videos show up, the officer is going to walk,” said Darren Baptiste, the creator of Cop Watch, an iPhone app that automatically begins recording when you tap its icon and automatically uploads the video to YouTube when the recording is stopped.

    https://jfaap.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/2015-03-21-178.jpg

    Mr. Baptiste, 47, is an app developer in Toronto, where several episodes of force by police — some of them eventually deemed unlawful — have been captured by citizens wielding cameras over the last few years. He said that when photographing the police during intense situations, people often get flustered — they may forget to hit record, or may not know how, or where, to upload a video. There have also been cases in which police, sometimes in violation of the law, confiscated cameras or phones containing stored recordings.

    The app, which Mr. Baptiste created with the Network for the Elimination of Police Violence, an advocacy group based in Toronto, is meant to make recording the police easier and to make the footage less vulnerable to confiscation by the authorities. Once a user uploads a video, the group is notified, and its staff can review and, if necessary, alert the news media and authorities of any apparent wrongdoing by police.

    Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/technology/phone-cameras-and-apps-help-speed-calls-for-police-reform.html?_r=0

  • Photos from March 19, 2015 protest at Toronto's police headquarters


    JFAAP standing up against police violence

     

     


    Black Action Defense Committee member speaking out against police violence

     

     


    Smash police violence

     



    OCAP organizer motivating the crowd to organize against police violence

     



    Cops doing what they do...serve and protect the interests of the ruling-class!

     


    Rights Watch Network's organizer standing firm against police violence

     

    Poverty and police violence are linked...police tend to operate like an occupation army in racialized working-class communities such as Jane-Finch and Jamestown.

  • Photos from Public Education Forum "Police Chief in Toronto: Friend or Foe"

    Photographs by Errol Young

    Event organized by Jane Finch Action Against Poverty & Network for the Elimination of Police Violence

    April 15, 2015 Public education meeting in the Jane and Finch community

     

     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


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