By ARNOLD A. AUGUSTE, Publisher/Senior Editor

It has been suggested to me that members of the community, meaning the Black community, should support the city's new police chief.

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The message, I guess, is that because he is Black, he deserves our support. It might also be meant to suggest that if he fails, it would look bad on us.

I don't have a problem supporting him. In fact, most of us would want to support him. But we would want to know that he is also going to be supporting us; that he would be the catalyst for change in the way policing affects Black people in this city.

It is time we stop supporting people just because they share our skin colour. We need more than that. We need to know that they share our values; our concerns; our fears, our sense of place in this society and, when placed in a position to make a difference, are willing to step up.

We need our teachers to pay special attention to the education of Black children. We need Black police officers to ensure the rights of Black people in their custody are respected and to lead by example. We need our judges, justices of the peace, lawyers – both defence and crown – to do all they can where possible to avoid the warehousing and further criminalizing of Black youth in correctional facilities by finding alternative solutions instead of just going with the flow.

We need our politicians to speak up for the community and speak out on issues affecting the community. Having a Black face in Queen's Park is not enough. We need a Black voice. Or voices. We need to know that when issues arise that affect us, there is someone in the room who has our back.

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We need those people appointed to important positions – committees, boards, commissions, etc. – in government and the private sector to understand that maybe, just maybe, those who made those appointments might really want to get our unique perspective and not just to hear what they can hear from anyone else. Speak up for the community. Otherwise you are useless to them ... and to us.

What is the Association of Black Law Enforcement's (ABLE) position on the issue of carding and the over-policing of Black youth in this city?

Why haven't we heard from the multitude of Black pastors, priests and other clergy in our community on issues affecting us? Aren't their members vulnerable? Don't they have young people in their places of worship who are affected by all the issues that affect the rest of the community? We know they do speak out on issues that affect other communities. What about ours?

Read more: http://sharenews.com/new-chief-should-test-his-support-in-service/#sthash.5ZFkhoJg.dpuf

By ARNOLD A. AUGUSTE, Publisher/Senior Editor


It has been suggested to me that members of the community, meaning the Black community, should support the city’s new police chief.

The message, I guess, is that because he is Black, he deserves our support. It might also be meant to suggest that if he fails, it would look bad on us.

I don’t have a problem supporting him. In fact, most of us would want to support him. But we would want to know that he is also going to be supporting us; that he would be the catalyst for change in the way policing affects Black people in this city.

It is time we stop supporting people just because they share our skin colour. We need more than that. We need to know that they share our values; our concerns; our fears, our sense of place in this society and, when placed in a position to make a difference, are willing to step up.

We need our teachers to pay special attention to the education of Black children. We need Black police officers to ensure the rights of Black people in their custody are respected and to lead by example. We need our judges, justices of the peace, lawyers – both defence and crown – to do all they can where possible to avoid the warehousing and further criminalizing of Black youth in correctional facilities by finding alternative solutions instead of just going with the flow.

We need our politicians to speak up for the community and speak out on issues affecting the community. Having a Black face in Queen’s Park is not enough. We need a Black voice. Or voices. We need to know that when issues arise that affect us, there is someone in the room who has our back.

We need those people appointed to important positions – committees, boards, commissions, etc. – in government and the private sector to understand that maybe, just maybe, those who made those appointments might really want to get our unique perspective and not just to hear what they can hear from anyone else. Speak up for the community. Otherwise you are useless to them … and to us.

What is the Association of Black Law Enforcement’s (ABLE) position on the issue of carding and the over-policing of Black youth in this city?

Why haven’t we heard from the multitude of Black pastors, priests and other clergy in our community on issues affecting us? Aren’t their members vulnerable? Don’t they have young people in their places of worship who are affected by all the issues that affect the rest of the community? We know they do speak out on issues that affect other communities. What about ours?

- See more at: http://sharenews.com/new-chief-should-test-his-support-in-service/#sthash.5ZFkhoJg.dpuf